IJCH cover

The International Journal of Circumpolar Health is a multidisciplinary journal that specializes in Arctic and Antarctic health issues, with a particular interest in the health of indigenous peoples.

The journal has just published a special supplement (Supplement 1, 2013) which includes 100 full length papers, 90 extended abstracts and nearly 100 short abstracts from the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health held in August 2012.

This issue has a number of full length and brief papers related to FASD, women’s addictions, and indigenous health. Here are some of the papers you might be interested in taking a look at:

Perceptions of needs regarding FASD across the province of British Columbia, Canada – Anne George, Cindy Hardy, Erica Clark (p. 91)

This study describes the perceived needs for services for people affected by FASD in rural and urban British Columbia.

Prenatal alcohol exposure among Alaska Native/American Indian infants – Burhan A. Khan, Renee F. Robinson, Julia J. Smith, Denise A. Dillard (p. 147)

A survey which found that rates of prenatal alcohol use are primarily limited to pre-conception and the 1st trimester, with a dramatic decrease in the 2nd and 3rd trimesters.

An examination of the social determinants of health as factors related to health, healing and prevention of foetal alcohol spectrum disorder in a northern context – the Brightening Our Home Fires Project, Northwest Territories, Canada – Dorothy Badry, Aileen Wight Felske (p. 169)

An exploratory study of the issue of the prevention of FASD from a women’s health perspective in the Northwest Territories of Canada.

Resituating the ethical gaze: government morality and the local worlds of impoverished Indigenous women – Caroline L. Tait (p. 200)

Drawing from a project documenting 100 life histories of Indigenous women with addictions and who have involvement with the child welfare system, as children or adults, this paper explores the influence of government policies and programs in Canada on recovery and healing.

Coordinating foetal alcohol syndrome interventions in Alaska – Kris Broom, Wendy Getchell, Chantelle Hardy, Garrett Hartley and Jessica Olson (p. 241)

A review of current Alaska FAS policies and interventions.

The healing constellation: a framework for understanding and treating trauma in Alaska Native women – Wendy H. Arundale (p. 243)

Connecting theory, research, and treatment approaches, a look at indigenous women’s substance use in relation to mental health, intergenerational trauma and other factors.

Community-driven alcohol policy and foetal alcohol spectrum disorder prevention: implications for Canada’s North? – Nancy Poole, Tasnim Nathoo and Arlene Hache (p. 250)

An exploration of the potentially important role of alcohol policy in northern communities in influencing alcohol use in pregnancy and risk of FASD.

The full publication is freely available for download here.

For more on FASD prevention in northern regions, see earlier posts: