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dorothy-awardDorothy Badry was honoured by the Premier’s Council on the Status of Persons with Disabilities for Alberta on December 2nd. Dorothy has been a long-time advocate, researcher and educator on the impact of FASD (and a dedicated member of the Prevention Network Action Team). Her work has contributed to FASD being recognized as a disability. For families and individuals affected by FASD, that recognition has made a huge difference.

In a University of Calgary article written about her, she describes FASD as an health “outcome” – a key shift from early stigmatizing assessments. This allows for a relational approach that includes women, children, families, and communities and for inclusive and multi-level prevention/intervention strategies.

An original member of the Canada FASD Research Network, we have benefited from Dorothy’s active participation and counsel. She has been featured in some of our previous blogs for her work at with University of Calgary, Alberta province, and several FASD-related programs. We are happy to feature her once again for this well-deserved honour. Congratulations, Dorothy Badry.

For related blogs, see previous postings:

“Developing Services for Canadians Living with FASD” interview with Dorothy Badry on Family Caregivers Unite! January 5, 2015

Alberta’s PCAP Women’s Quilt: “Creating a bond . . . Building a relationship” April 22, 2016

The work of the Network Action Team on FASD Prevention from a Women’s Health Determinants Perspective (CanFASD Research Network) April 11, 2016

Webinar: “Caregiving, FASD, and Alcohol: Caring about FASD Prevention” – September 9, 2015 August 25, 2015

First Peoples Child & Family Review journal: Special Issue on FASD December 9,

Case Management to Prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder September 20, 2013

Women’s health and FASD prevention in a special issue of the International Journal of Circumpolar Health August 6, 2013

Brightening Our Home Fires: An FASD Prevention and Women’s Health Project in Canada’s Northwest Territories May 6, 2013

The 5th International Conference on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Special Session on FASD Prevention January 14, 2013

Look for us at the 5th National Biennial Conference on Adolescents and Adults with FASD (April 18-21, 2012) April 9, 2012

PCAP quilt squareParent-Child Assistance Programs (PCAP) are one important approach to FASD prevention in a number of provinces in Canada and the U.S. These programs use a relational, women-centred, strengths-based approach, which is proven to be effective in FASD prevention [1, 2].

As a visual way to express their experiences of mentorship within Alberta’s PCAP program, women came together in workshops across the province to create individual quilt squares for a larger quilt.

The finished quilt, pictured below, captures the hope, resilience, acceptance and connection that participation in the PCAP program has brought them and their children.

revisedapril4 quilt photoIMG_7064

Described as lively, creative, interactive and dynamic, the workshops were held in Calgary, Edmonton and several rural communities; women were supported by their mentors in getting to them. The workshops built connection between women as well as long-term relationships with their children and their mentors.

Developed and researched by Dorothy Badry, Kristin Bonot and Rhonda Delorme, a full description of the project is here.This is the second quilt project from Alberta’s PCAP program; the first quilt was made by mentors (read more about that project here).

To read earlier blogs about FASD primary prevention projects in Canada follow the links below:

The Mother-Child Study

H.E.R. Pregnancy Program

The Mothering Project

HerWay Home Program

FASD Prevention in Saskatchewan

Harm Reduction and Pregnancy

1. Thanh, N.X., et al., An economic evaluation of the parent-child assistance program for preventing fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in Alberta, Canada. Adm Policy Ment Health, 2015. 42(1): p. 10-8. View article link
2. Grant, T.M., et al., Preventing alcohol and drug exposed births in Washington state: Intervention findings from three parent-child assistance program sites. The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 2005. 31(3): p. 471-490. View PDF

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The Canadian Association of Pediatric Health Centres is hosting a free webinar on International FASD Day, September 9th, 2015.

Award-winning journalist and author, Ann Dowsett Johnston will discuss dismantling stigma and how to address an alcogenic culture that blames and shames the FASD community.

Dr. Dorothy Badry and Dr. Deb Goodman will discuss a practical set of tools and resources that will be useful to healthcare practitioners and caregivers. The Caregiver Curriculum on FASD and the website www.fasdchildwelfare.ca were developed in response to an identified need for training on FASD that was accessible and available to caregivers supporting individuals with this lifelong disability on a day to day basis.

The webinar will be held on September 9th from 11:00am-12:30pm EST. Click here for more information and to register.

'Family Caregivers Unite! I VoiceAmerica

University of Calgary professor and Canada FASD Research Network member, Dorothy Badry, was interviewed in December 2014 on the live talk radio program Family Caregivers Unite!

The one hour episode, hosted by Dr. Gordon Atherley, focused on the topic of “Developing Services for Canadians Living with FASD.”

Dr. Badry discusses her earlier PhD work,  ‘Becoming a Birth Mother of a Child with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome’, which reviewed the lives of 8 women aged 25 to 60 who gave birth to children diagnosed with FAS. She talks about her life, career, and her experience of family caregiving for close family members with serious health conditions.

Dr. Badry, drawing upon her experiences in the social work field, also discusses types of services provided for individuals with FASD and their families. She also touches on prevention issues such as increasing rates of binge drinking in youth, the Parent-Child Assistance Program, and the role of men in supporting women.

Dr. Badry is currently the co-chair of the Education and Training Council of the Alberta FASD Cross Ministry Committee and a member of the Prairie Child Welfare Consortium.

Listen to the interview here (via streaming, in iTunes or download the MP3).

One of her recent projects has been the development of the Caregiver Curriculum on FASD on the http://www.fasdchildwelfare.ca website.

Also check out this article on how Dr. Badry’s work is influencing work in indigenous communities in Australia: Canadian fetal alcohol programs inspire Australian researcher (November 26. 2014).

'Canadian fetal alcohol programs inspire Australian researcher I

 

 

FPCFR

The First Peoples Child & Family Review is a Canadian journal dedicated to interdisciplinary research honouring the voices, perspectives and knowledges of First Peoples through research, critical analyses, stories, standpoints and media reviews.

The Fall 2013 issue focuses specifically on FASD. Dorothy Badry and Tara Hanson describe the importance of this focus in the introduction:

“This special edition of The First Peoples Child & Family Review explores the social issue of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) from the perspectives, experiences and needs of Aboriginal peoples. It recognizes that the context of FASD in Aboriginal communities is unique, and cannot be properly acknowledged or addressed through generalized studies and services.

As the articles in this edition illustrate, the issue and experience of Aboriginal peoples and FASD must be understood within the context of colonization and its intergenerational impacts. Without this critical lens, research findings and service recommendations may be inappropriate to Aboriginal families or communities. Mainstream programs developed from a Euro-Western perspective may conflict with Aboriginal worldviews.

The articles in this edition portray the human experience of struggles with alcohol, the role of history and trauma in adverse life outcomes as well as the existence of socioeconomic disparities. Experiences with child welfare and legal systems are chronicled, disruptions, difficulties and repercussive impacts of secondary disabilities. Along with the adversities, however, are powerful themes of hope, healing, promising practices, capabilities, and strength found through caring relationships.” (p. 5)

Several articles focus on FASD prevention and tackle topics such as developing community programs for pregnant and early parenting women who use alcohol and other substances that operate from an Indigenous knowledge framework, FASD prevention with women who have FASD themselves, and insights from workers in a home visitation program for women with a history of alcohol and drug abuse.

Many people continue to mistakenly believe that FASD is primarily an Indigenous issue (this is definitely not the case – FASD is an issue wherever women drink alcohol during pregnancy). It is true, though, that many Indigenous communities have been working to address FASD and related social concerns for longer than many non-Indigenous communities – this special issue highlights some of the leadership and innovation that many communities have taken in the past few years.

View the table of contents and download free full-text for all the articles here.

 

IJCH cover

The International Journal of Circumpolar Health is a multidisciplinary journal that specializes in Arctic and Antarctic health issues, with a particular interest in the health of indigenous peoples.

The journal has just published a special supplement (Supplement 1, 2013) which includes 100 full length papers, 90 extended abstracts and nearly 100 short abstracts from the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health held in August 2012.

This issue has a number of full length and brief papers related to FASD, women’s addictions, and indigenous health. Here are some of the papers you might be interested in taking a look at:

Perceptions of needs regarding FASD across the province of British Columbia, Canada – Anne George, Cindy Hardy, Erica Clark (p. 91)

This study describes the perceived needs for services for people affected by FASD in rural and urban British Columbia.

Prenatal alcohol exposure among Alaska Native/American Indian infants – Burhan A. Khan, Renee F. Robinson, Julia J. Smith, Denise A. Dillard (p. 147)

A survey which found that rates of prenatal alcohol use are primarily limited to pre-conception and the 1st trimester, with a dramatic decrease in the 2nd and 3rd trimesters.

An examination of the social determinants of health as factors related to health, healing and prevention of foetal alcohol spectrum disorder in a northern context – the Brightening Our Home Fires Project, Northwest Territories, Canada – Dorothy Badry, Aileen Wight Felske (p. 169)

An exploratory study of the issue of the prevention of FASD from a women’s health perspective in the Northwest Territories of Canada.

Resituating the ethical gaze: government morality and the local worlds of impoverished Indigenous women – Caroline L. Tait (p. 200)

Drawing from a project documenting 100 life histories of Indigenous women with addictions and who have involvement with the child welfare system, as children or adults, this paper explores the influence of government policies and programs in Canada on recovery and healing.

Coordinating foetal alcohol syndrome interventions in Alaska – Kris Broom, Wendy Getchell, Chantelle Hardy, Garrett Hartley and Jessica Olson (p. 241)

A review of current Alaska FAS policies and interventions.

The healing constellation: a framework for understanding and treating trauma in Alaska Native women – Wendy H. Arundale (p. 243)

Connecting theory, research, and treatment approaches, a look at indigenous women’s substance use in relation to mental health, intergenerational trauma and other factors.

Community-driven alcohol policy and foetal alcohol spectrum disorder prevention: implications for Canada’s North? – Nancy Poole, Tasnim Nathoo and Arlene Hache (p. 250)

An exploration of the potentially important role of alcohol policy in northern communities in influencing alcohol use in pregnancy and risk of FASD.

The full publication is freely available for download here.

For more on FASD prevention in northern regions, see earlier posts:

Overview: Four Levels of FASD Prevention

Information Sheet: What Men Can Do To Prevent FASD

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