How interagency and cross-sectoral partnerships are contributing to prevention of FASD

Over the past three years, the Co-Creating Evidence study (CCE) has been exploring best practices in the delivery of community-based wraparound programs that support pregnant and parenting women with substance use concerns in Canada. The CCE team recently published an article about how the partnerships fostered and maintained by community-based wraparound programs make a difference in their work and are in fact a best practice.

The CCE project team interviewed 60 partners and 108 staff of the eight programs involved in the CCE study. The interviews focused on the nature and benefits of interagency and cross-sectoral partnerships. The study found that these programs most commonly formed partnerships with child welfare and health services such as primary care, public health, mental health services and maternal addictions programmes, yet they also partnered to some degree with housing, income assistance, Indigenous cultural programming, infant development and legal services.

Key benefits of partnerships identified were:

  • improved access by clients to health and social care that addresses social determinants of health. This access includes expanded programming in the program sites, increased understanding of partners’ services, and greater ease of referral to other supports and programs as needed by clients.
  • increased knowledge on the part of both the interagency partners and the wraparound service providers about the experiences that women face, such as the significance of poverty and trauma to women’s substance use. In turn this positively promotes non-judgemental and trauma-informed approaches with pregnant women and new mothers, as well as provision of more multifaceted and paced supports to address their needs.
  • improved child welfare outcomes. The program level relationships with child welfare workers, and in some cases integration of a social worker onsite, results in increased planning for positive mother-child outcomes during the pregnancy, improved mother-child connections after birth and reduced likelihood of the infant being removed from the woman’s care at birth.
  • strengthened cultural safety within the programming and (re)connection to culture by women. Partnerships with Indigenous organizations enhances learning by program providers about how to work in a culturally safe way and increased opportunities for referral to Indigenous programming for those women interested in connecting to their culture as a part of their wellness/recovery.

“The programmes participating in the Co-Creating Evidence study were both creative and flexible when developing partnerships, seeking opportunities in areas in which they did not have the resources or expertise, as well as with services with whom they had a common cause, for example mutual clients, a shared desire to ‘wrap support’ around women to meet their evolving needs and aligned approaches (harm reduction, trauma informed practice).”

Hubberstey, C., Rutman, D., Van Bibber, M., & Poole, N. (2021). Wraparound programmes for pregnant and parenting women with substance use concerns in Canada: Partnerships are essential Health and Social Care in the Community  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/hsc.13664

The partnerships continue to evolve through dialogue, collaboration and communication. What the study has identified is how, through these partnerships, wraparound program providers are contributing to the reduction of fragmentation between the health, child welfare and addictions fields – and in turn to important benefits for clients in terms of access to care and enduring connections with their children. In the work on prevention of FASD, it has repeatedly been emphasized how important the role of “Level 3 and 4” programming is, particularly in how such programs attend to the range of determinants of women’s health and alcohol use. Clearly it is in part through partnership work that FASD prevention is achieved.

“Learning to Understand”

When we first formed the Prevention Network Action Team over a decade ago, we insisted on calling it the Network Action Team on FASD Prevention from a Women’s Health Determinants Perspective.  We did not want FASD prevention to have a sole focus on stopping or reducing alcohol use but instead to have a wider focus on the need for changing systemic as well as personal and interpersonal influences on women’s alcohol use.  One such systemic influence is women’s experience of trauma and violence.

Understanding the impact of trauma and violence on women and gender diverse people’s lives has never been more important as we in Canada read and absorb the findings of Reclaiming Power and Place: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Canada. We are called upon to understand and act against systemic processes such as racism, sexism and misogyny, and structural oppression related to ongoing and widespread violence against women, social and economic marginalization of Indigenous women, and the multigenerational effects of horrific colonial and patriarchal practices.

The MMIWG report sets out seven principles for change that inform the 231 Calls for Justice needing action across federal, provincial, territorial and Indigenous governments, industries, institutions, health care, child welfare, correctional services, and policing.  Some of these principles we have often discussed and promoted in our work on FASD prevention. They include:

  1. A focus on substantive equality and human and Indigenous rights
  2. A decolonizing approach
  3. The inclusion of families and survivors
  4. Self-determined and Indigenous-led solutions and services
  5. Recognition of distinctions (i.e., the diversity of Indigenous peoples)
  6. Cultural safety
  7. A trauma-informed approach

In addition to the Calls for Justice, several action plans have been created in order to enact change. The Native Women’s Association of Canada has committed to taking leadership and action to end the violence and genocide, and to the full implementation of an Action Plan they have developed for: ending the violence including all forms of race-and gender-based violence, and upholding dignity and justice for Indigenous women, girls and gender-diverse people in Canada. There are many opportunities within their Action Plan where we who are working on FASD prevention can work together on key actions they have identified.  Here are three examples:

  • Continue ongoing health, policy, research, training and programs to support Indigenous-led health initiatives (page 22)
  • Create and implement awareness building campaigns that will educate the public about MMIWG and the issues and roots of violence (page 38)
  • Monitor media stories and track inaccurate portrayal of Indigenous women (page 41), so that portrayals that perpetuate negative stereotypes of Indigenous women are challenged/stopped and the “curious silence” (page 388 of the MMIWG report) of the media in covering the lives of Indigenous women is addressed.

National and regional Inuit organizations have also developed an action plan. The National Inuit Action Plan was developed by a 10-member Working Group, co-chaired by Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK) and Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada. The National Inuit Action Plan also identifies a wide range of areas where concrete, timely and measurable positive changes need to be made for Inuit women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people to achieve substantive equality. The image from page 6 of that report illustrates the breadth of the work that needs to be done, how we in FASD prevention can align our actions.

Harriet Visitor, an Indigenous educator and niece of Chanie Wendak, used the expression “learning to understand” on the radio this past week. She describes this as different than simply learning, it involves unlearning, not turning a blind eye, and acting. In the case of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, it involves supporting decolonization and revitalization of Indigenous culture and doing everything in our power to ensure the future is one where Indigenous women can thrive as leaders, teachers and healers, and be acknowledged and honoured for their expertise, agency and wisdom.

Resources:

The Remarkable Findings of the Co-Creating Evidence Evaluation Study

Preventing Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) requires a range of efforts from general awareness to targeted prevention and treatment services. In the Canadian Four-Part FASD Prevention Model, Level 3 and 4 programs provide low barrier holistic services for pregnant or parenting women who face substance use and a range of other health and social burdens and challenges.

Over a four-year period, the Co-Creating Evidence (CCE) evaluation study has involved eight different community-based Level 3 & 4 programs that support women through the provision of holistic, wraparound services, and in doing so, see FASD prevention as part of their mandate. These programs are guided by theoretical approaches such as being trauma-informed, relationship-based, women-centred, culturally grounded and harm reducing. The evaluation team has been led by the Nota Bene Consulting Group and has involved researchers from the Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health and representatives of the eight programs. 

This CCE evaluative study (2017-2020) has had three main research questions:

  1. What are the common elements of the diverse Level 3 programs across Canada?
  2. What program components are helpful from women’s perspectives?
  3. What are best measures to evidence outcomes and what outcomes are being achieved?

The answers to these questions are now available via:

In all these documents, service providers, researchers, policy makers and women with lived/living experience will see promising approaches and outcomes that these programs provide and the women who access these programs are realizing, together with their community partners. This study makes a significant contribution to our understanding of this level of FASD prevention. It hopefully will be an inspiration to all those committed to this important work. 

Funding for this project has been received from the Public Health Agency of Canada, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) National Strategic Project Fund. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Innu Approaches to Supporting Pregnancy and Birthing

Examples of Holistic FASD Prevention in Practice

Developing specialized, culturally safe, and holistic support for pregnant women is an important strategy in preventing FASD [1]. In Labrador, Thea Penashue and June Fry of the Innu Roundtable Secretariat are bringing Innu midwifery and parenting back to Sheshatshiu and Mushuau Innu First Nations through two initiatives.

Centering Pregnancy was introduced in Sheshatshiu in 2018 to increase access to and use of primary prenatal care. The project was born from dialogues between the Innu Round Table Secretariat, Innu Health Directors, the Regional Health Board, physicians, and public health nurses. Centering Pregnancy is a group pregnancy outreach program where women can access prenatal group education, health assessments, and social support. The program promotes relationship-building by allowing participants to bring supports with them to the group sessions and encouraging discussion and bonding between women within the program. Expectant mothers have autonomy and control in their care in addition to support from a health care worker [2].

The Innu Midwifery Project aims to reintroduce traditional midwifery to Sheshatshiu and Natuashish, drawing on Innu Elders’ knowledge of Innu birthing practices. The project is being done in collaboration with Gisela Becker, the Chief Midwife for Newfoundland and Labrador, to support the training Innu midwives using a culturally-specific, hands-on, individually paced learning approach. Reintroducing midwifery to the Innu First Nations will result in Innu children being born on Innu lands, fostering a greater connection to the land and culture, continuation of cultural practices and culturally safe care, and empowering women in the context of their pregnancy.

Credit: “A Guide to the Innu Care Approach” from the Innu Round Table Secretariat website [5].

These initiatives create a safer environment for Innu women to discuss their health. Based in and driven by the communities and culture, these programs are centered around women, their families, and the communities [3].

Thea Penashue, the Community Wellness Systems Navigator at the Innu Round Table Secretariat, delivered her second child in a tshuap, a traditional Innu tent, in September. She hopes that, through the Midwifery project and Centering Pregnancy program, more Innu women will be able to give birth in a tshuap, connecting to their land, culture, and sense of self as Innu people, in the company of their loved ones [4].

Credit “A Guide to the Innu Care Approach” from the Innu Round Table Secretariat website [5].

1. Canada FASD Research Network’s Action Team on FASD Prevention from a Women’s Health Determinants Perspective, 2013. PREVENTION Of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) A Multi-Level Model. [online] Available at: <https://canfasd.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/PREVENTION-of-Fetal-Alcohol-Spectrum-Disorder-FASD-A-multi-level-model.pdf&gt; [Accessed 24 September 2020].

2. Centering Healthcare Institute. n.d. Centering Pregnancy | Centering Healthcare Institute. [online] Available at: <https://www.centeringhealthcare.org/what-we-do/centering-pregnancy&gt; [Accessed 24 September 2020].

3. Network Action Team on FASD prevention, 2010. Consensus Statement On 10 Fundamental Components Of FASD Prevention From A Women’S Health Determinants Perspective. [online] Canada Northwest FASD Research Network. Available at: <https://canfasd.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/ConsensusStatement.pdf&gt; [Accessed 24 September 2020].

4. CBC, 2020. This Mom Is Bringing Back An Innu Tradition, By Giving Birth In A Tent To Connect With Her Roots. [online] Available at: <https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/penashue-tent-birth-1.5713780&gt; [Accessed 24 September 2020].

5. Innu Round Table Secretariat, 2017. A Guide To The Innu Care Approach. [online] Available at: <http://www.irtsec.ca/2016/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/A-Guide-to-the-Innu-Care-Approach-Dec-2017.pdf&gt; [Accessed 24 September 2020].

Addressing the priorities of the pNAT in 2020

As we continue to connect our work in Canada on FASD prevention, via the Prevention Network Action Team on FASD Prevention from a Women’s Health Determinants Perspective (pNAT), new priorities for action emerge.  These are five priorities that this virtual community identified for the coming year.

  1. Cross-sector collaboration

Collaboration across fields provides an important opportunity to support mothers, children, and women who may be at risk of using substances during pregnancy. Resources, such as Mothering and Opioids: Addressing Stigma – Acting Collaboratively, highlight opportunities for collaboration across fields to foster advocacy, streamline service delivery and referrals, and offer systems navigation.

  1. Indigenous approaches to FASD prevention

There are an increasing number of wholistic FASD prevention and wellness programs that are incorporating culture and language, traditional knowledge, and land-based programming, while responding to the needs of families and communities. Programs such as Circle of Life in Terrace, Xyólhmettsel Syémyem (Family Empowerment Team) in Chilliwack and others highlighted in the recent booklet, Revitalizing Culture and Healing: Indigenous Approaches to FASD Prevention, bring attention to the importance of community-led, community-driven FASD prevention and wellness programs.

  1. Trauma-informed practice

Trauma-informed practice and policy development are essential components in responding to each level of the four-part prevention model. Trauma-informed services recognize the interconnections of trauma, mental health, and substance use and the role that substance use may have in coping with past or current violence or trauma. When discussing alcohol and other substance use, trauma-informed approaches will promote building relationships, building upon individuals’ strengths, and offering choice and collaboration in service provision.

  1. Stigma reduction

There has been an increasing focus on reducing stigma that mothers and women who use substances during pregnancy experience. By reducing stigma, pregnant women and mothers will be able to better access necessary supports and servicces that support stigma reduction. The recent issue paper from the Canada FASD Research Network on mothers’ experience of stigma through a multi-level model offers recommendations and recommended resources for service providers, health systems planners, and policymakers.

  1. Keeping families together

More attention is being brought to service delivery models that have the goal of keeping families together. These programs, which range from co-located multi-service programming to mentor and peer support models increase women’s access to prenatal care, health care, social support, advocacy, and childcare. PNAT members from programs such as the Parent-Child Assistance Program, Sheway in Vancouver, HerWayHome in Victoria, H.E.R. Pregnancy Program in Edmonton, Manito Ikwe Kagiikwe (the Mothering Project) in Winnipeg, and Mothercraft (Breaking the Cycle) in Toronto are helping us understand how this goal can be achieved in community contexts.

Considerations for Supporting Healthy Families and Healthy Beginnings

Revitalizing Culture and Healing: Indigenous Approaches to FASD Prevention is a new resource developed by program providers and experts in Indigenous women’s health and researchers from the Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health, in partnership  with the First Nations Health Authority in BC. The resource includes a beautiful and FASD preventionthoughtful introduction by Marilyn Van Bibber and highlights seven community led and culture driven programs. Each program successfully integrates culture, language, and healing into their program in order to improve the health and wellness of women, children, their families, and their communities. Marilyn is well known for her development of the first resource on Indigenous approaches to FASD prevention in Canada, entitled It Takes a Community published in 1996.

The programs highlighted in this resource use the traditional holistic view of health and wellness that encourages balance between mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual health. They incorporate culture and language, coordinate basic needs, and address women, their families, and their communities’ unique and complex needs by promoting healing through language, ceremony, traditional knowledge, land-based programming, involvement of Elders, and more.

The driving principles that contribute to the success of these programs is that they are community led, culture driven, strengths-based, and provide wraparound support that address broad social and structural factors that impact individuals’ and their families’ lives across the lifespan.

Program planners and service providers can learn from the lessons shared from these programs and integrate the following 4 considerations that support healthy beginnings:

  1. Use Non-Stigmatizing Language

Service providers and healthcare professionals should use strengths based language that promotes wellbeing, creates safe spaces for women and girls to discuss their substance use, and helps women and girls build confidence and ask for support. Providers should shift towards using person-first language in their practices, where clients are identified as a person rather than by their health condition or behaviours. Some examples my include shifting from language “addicts” to “women who use alcohol” and from “she admitted to drinking alcohol during pregnancy” to “she reported drinking during pregnancy.”

For more information on the strengths-based language, the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction and Canada FASD Research Network have released language guides to support the use of non-stigmatizing language when discussing substance use and FASD.

  1. Identify Existing Community Strengths and Programming

Meeting with existing services to see how they are, or could be, a part of wellness and FASD prevention initiatives is an important strategy in identifying community strengths and linkages that can better support healthy beginnings and healthy families. Identifying these strengths and linkages can better support current or existing program planners in developing a realistic goal for program delivery in your community.

  1. Connecting with those who have Walked the Path Before Us

The programs featured in this booklet enact approaches that have been successful at implementing community led, and culture based approaches to improving the health of women, their families, and their communities. The lessons and approaches in these programs demonstrate what decolonized approaches to FASD prevention can look like.

  1. Identifying Potential Funding Partners

Building relationships with potential funders is an important step towards developing or supporting community-based prevention programs. The breadth of these programs – in addressing a multitude of needs – demonstrate the varied funding that can support families. Given how the programs enact evidence informed and wise practices, it is important that stable and long term support is provided to ensure the programs’ ongoing responsivity and development.

For more information on the seven highlighted programs, four critical considerations, and to review the eight reflection questions on how to support healthy beginnings in your community, see the booklet, Revitalizing Culture and Healing: Indigenous Approaches to FASD Prevention.

Emerging Approaches to FASD Prevention

One year ago, the Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health released Doorways to Conversation: Brief Intervention on Substance Use with Girls and Women. Since then, there has been a growing interest in expanding work on brief interventions and FASD prevention, to be inclusive of multiple substances and multiple health issues for women, their families and communities.

Here are four innovative ways that brief discussion about alcohol and other substance use is being expanded:

In Sexual Health

Sexual health clinicians are well positioned to deliver brief substance use interventions due to their open, non-judgmental and harm reduction-oriented model of practice. Sexual health providers are able to discuss substance use together with contraceptive use and/or sexually transmitted and blood borne infections [1, 2]. Conversations about substances, sex, and safety can support a woman’s decisions and confidence for change towards improving health in whatever area fits for her.

Linking Discussion of Multiple Substances

Cannabis legalization provides a ‘window of opportunity’ to engage in discussions about alcohol, tobacco, and cannabis use in pregnancy. Discussing what we know and don’t know about cannabis use in pregnancy can now be linked to open conversations about alcohol and other substance use in pregnancy.

Understanding the Link to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

Research on ACEs shows how a history of childhood stressors, including physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, may influence alcohol use among adults including pregnant women [3]. Adopting a trauma-informed approach in conversations about alcohol use in pregnancy supports women who experienced childhood adversity with safety, choices, collaboration, self compassion and skills for change.

Advancing Indigenous Wellness Approaches

Holistic, relational, community-based, and culture-led FASD prevention initiatives are key to wellness for pregnant women in Indigenous communities [4]. These interventions address the broad social and structural determinants of health that are associated with substance use and respond to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Call to Action #33.

References

  1. Lane, J., et al., Nurse-provided screening and brief intervention for risky alcohol consumption by sexual health clinic patients. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 2008. 84(7): p. 524-527.
  2. Crawford, M.J., et al., The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of brief intervention for excessive alcohol consumption among people attending sexual health clinics: a randomised controlled trial (SHEAR). Health Technology Assessment, 2014. 18(8): p. 1-48.
  3. Frankenberger, D.J., K. Clements-Nolle, and W. Yang, The Association between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Alcohol Use during Pregnancy in a Representative Sample of Adult Women. Women’s Health Issues, 2015. 25(6): p. 688 – 695.
  4. Wolfson, L., et al., Collaborative Action on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Prevention: Principles for Enacting the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Call to Action #33. International Journal Of Environmental Research And Public Health, 2019. 16(9).

Indigenous Approaches to FASD Prevention – A response to TRC Call-to-Action #33

 

Brief Interventions

Indigenous Mothering

Welness

Community Action

Reconciliation & Healing
Five new booklets on Indigenous Approaches to FASD Prevention have just been published. They were developed  following the Dialogue to Action on Prevention of FASD meeting in May 2017, and reflect the 8 tenets of the Consensus Statement created by participants for enacting the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Call-to-Action #33:

“We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to recognize as a high priority the need to address and prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and to develop, in collaboration with Aboriginal people, FASD preventive programs that can be delivered in a culturally appropriate manner.” – Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

The booklets were written by Tasnim Nathoo and Nancy Poole of the Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health in collaboration with the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, and Canada FASD Research Network. Topics include: Brief Interventions with Girls and Women, Mothering, Wellness, Community Action, and Reconciliation and Healing. Printed booklets are being shared with those who attended the meeting in May and with Indigenous communities who may find them helpful as they plan FASD prevention efforts. Links to PDF versions are included in this blog.

Grounded in research, the booklets prioritize Indigenous knowledge for implementing culturally-safe, cross-disciplinary, cross-organizational, and collaborative approaches to FASD prevention. As well, each booklet offers discussion questions that shift the lens from a primary focus on alcohol use during pregnancy, to a holistic focus that aligns with Indigenous values and worldviews to support change and transformation in all systems of care.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) provided a process for discovering the harms and injustices that Aboriginal people experienced as part of the Indian Residential School system with an aim to build a lasting and respectful foundation of reconciliation across Canada. TRC findings were released in 2015 along with 94 Calls-To-Action (CTA), including CTA #33, which focuses on FASD prevention.

 

See earlier posts on these topics:

DEVELOPING AN INDIGENOUS APPROACH TO FASD PREVENTION IN BC’S FRASER SALISH REGION December 11, 2017

INNU COMMUNITY FASD PREVENTION IN LABRADOR October 27, 2017

FASD PREVENTION WITH INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES IN AUSTRALIA April 3, 2017

THE MOTHERING PROJECT/MANITO IKWE KAGIIKWE IN WINNIPEG, MANITOBA May 1, 2015

POSTCOLONIAL THEORY FOR BEGINNERS
September 1, 2010

Developing an Indigenous Approach to FASD Prevention in BC’s Fraser Salish Region

The First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) in British Columbia is exploring a partnership approach to developing a community-based FASD prevention strategy in the Fraser Salish region.

Inspired by the Marulu Strategy in the Fitzroy Valley of Western Australia and the work of other Indigenous communities in Canada, the FNHA Community Wellness Support team brought together individuals and organizations working in health care, child welfare, early childhood development, community wellness and other related areas for a one-day meeting on December 1, 2017. The meeting was held on the on the traditional territory of the Musqueam people.

The meeting began with an opening prayer and welcome from a Musqueam Elder. In the morning, participants learned about the successful Family Empowerment Team in the Stó:lō Nation (the Stó:lō traditional territory extends from Yale to Langley, BC). The program is based on the Parent Child Assistance Program (PCAP) model developed by Therese Grant at the University of Washington in 1991 which has been shown to an effective approach to preventing FASD.

The Family Empowerment Team has built upon the PCAP model to develop a holistic and culturally relevant approach to FASD prevention in the Stó:lō Nation. Meeting attendees had the unique opportunity to hear from a woman who has participated in the program and to hear how the program has supported her and her family to reach her goals.

In the afternoon, members of Alberta’s Parent-Child Assistance Program Council shared their experiences of working with and supporting over 30 PCAP programs in Alberta and how different agencies, groups, and government departments have collaborated in developing a 10-year provincial strategy to address FASD.


For more on these topics, see these earlier posts:

Alberta Parent-Child Assistance Program Quilt, December 8, 2014

Films from the Lililwan Project: Tristan and Marulu, May 9, 2012

FASD Mentoring Programs in Canada, December 7, 2011

 

Housing is key component to women’s recovery

Sheway is well-known in Canada for its success in providing wrap-around services for pregnant and newly parenting women who are dealing with complex personal and social circumstances. It is trauma-informed, women-centred, culturally responsive and uses a harm reduction approach with a focus on connection with self and others. Women and their children can remain in the program up to 18 months post-partum. Last December, Lenora Marcellus, University of Victoria, and Sheway published findings to their study on how women make the transition from Sheway to living on their own – Supporting Families at Sheway and Beyond. Additionally, Dr. Marcellus has published a journal article:

Marcellus, L. (2017). A grounded theory of mothering in the early years for women recovering from substance use. Journal of Family Nursing. E-print ahead of press. 

In order to learn what elements of a positive transition could be identified and built upon, they followed 18 women for 3 years after leaving Sheway. These women faced multiple obstacles in this transition process with the overarching theme being “holding it together.” Their daily efforts are explored in these 3 ways:

Download Sheway Report

Restoring Self: gaining recovery and taking care of self, reconnecting with self and others, and rebuilding trust and credibility.

Centering Family: parenting their children, preserving a routine, dealing with partners, and handling custody issues.

Creating  Home: “chasing housing”, having to take whatever housing is available even if inadequate, and maintaining not only a physical space but a feeling of home for the family

While acknowledging the value for pregnancy and postpartum support as most often provided in maternity programs, their findings underscore that secure housing is a key component to a successful transition for women and their families. Yet, although housing is important to the overall health of women and their families, the choices they must make often result in a double bind. For example, women often are faced with choosing between affordable housing that is far from supports versus more expensive housing that is near supports. Some women must choose between staying in an unsafe relationship or losing housing. As well, some women must accept inadequate housing because of their substance use history, which serves to undermine their recovery and their maintaining custody of their children.

“Poor housing was identified by women as a potential trigger to relapse in their recovery.” – [1] p. 39

Complete findings are detailed within the report and recommendations are framed within the Levels of Prevention model developed by this prevention network.  Among the research team recommendations is to extend the time women can stay in the program in order to solidify recovery, supports and resources. As well, they stress that housing needs to be a core component of intensive, integrated maternity programs.


For more on these topics, see earlier posts:

HOLISTIC AND SPECIALIZED SUPPORT FOR PREGNANT WOMEN: LEVEL 3 PREVENTION, November 21, 2016
THE MOTHER-CHILD STUDY: EVALUATING TREATMENTS FOR SUBSTANCE-USING WOMEN, MARCH 18, 2015
SUPPORTING PREGNANT AND PARENTING WOMEN WHO USE SUBSTANCES: WHAT COMMUNITIES ARE DOING TO HELP, OCTOBER 1, 2012
HERWAY HOME ‘ONE-STOP ACCESS’ PROGRAM IN VICTORIA SET TO OPEN, MAY 20, 2012
“NEW CHOICES” FOR PREGNANT AND PARENTING WOMEN WITH ADDICTIONS, JANUARY 9, 2012
TORONTO CENTRE FOR SUBSTANCE USE IN PREGNANCY (T-CUP), DECEMBER 19, 2011
CLINICAL WEBCAST ON BREAKING THE CYCLE PROGRAM: SEPTEMBER 20, 2011, AUGUST 2, 2011

  1. Marcellus, L., Supporting families at Sheway and beyond: Self, recovery, family home. 2016, Sheway: Vancouver, BC.