The Ripple Effect of the Relational Approach to Preventing FASD

Adopting a relational approach to FASD prevention has been identified as one of the 10 fundamental components of FASD prevention from a women’s health determinants perspective1. This approach recognizes that relationships are central to our lives and therefore processes of healing and change cannot occur without addressing disconnection and isolation.

Building trusting and supportive relationships is foundational to women feeling safe and confident enough to take on the challenges of reducing substance use, addressing trauma, and parenting. As such, the relational approach addresses a core aspect of women’s health, stimulating a ripple effect that can enact change and growth in the lives of women at risk of having children with FASD.

Breaking the Cycle (BTC) has been delivering services using a relational lens since 1997 and have found that relationships facilitate healing and change for mothers, children, and the mother-child dyad through improving self-efficacy, instilling purpose, and increasing engagement in services2. The program emphasizes relationships of many types, including those among staff, between women and their children, staff and women, and the organization and service partners.

Breaking the Cycle Compendium Volume 2 – Healing Through Relationships  compiles research conducted between 2008 and 2018, and the evidence shows that the relational approach offers opportunities to model relationships based on equality, empowerment, and respect, and that having strong relationships with service providers can have more impact on women’s health than the services themselves. Additionally, emphasizing interagency and intra-agency relationships and collaborations better positions a program to meet the needs of the women and children receiving services3. Through this approach, the BTC program has been successful in preventing FASD and has also positively increased confidence in parenting and mother-child bonds.

In focusing interventions and preventative efforts on building belonging and connection, existing and future programs can better address root causes of women’s substance use. It is from here that we can stimulate a ripple effect to make positive changes in the psychological, emotional, and physical health of mothers and their children.

1. Network Action Team on FASD Prevention. (2010). Consensus on 10 fundamental components of FASD prevention from a women’s health determinants perspective. Canada Northwest FASD Research Network.

2. Motz, M., Reynolds, W., Leslie, M. (2020). The Breaking the Cycle Compendium Volume 2 – Healing Through Relationships. Toronto: Mothercraft Press.

3. Network Action Team on FASD Prevention. (2010). Taking a relational approach: The importance of timely and supportive connections for women. Canada Northwest FASD Research Network.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s