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Brief Interventions

Indigenous Mothering

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Reconciliation & Healing

Five new booklets on Indigenous Approaches to FASD Prevention have just been published. They were developed  following the Dialogue to Action on Prevention of FASD meeting in May 2017, and reflect the 8 tenets of the Consensus Statement created by participants for enacting the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Call-to-Action #33:

“We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to recognize as a high priority the need to address and prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and to develop, in collaboration with Aboriginal people, FASD preventive programs that can be delivered in a culturally appropriate manner.” – Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

The booklets were written by Tasnim Nathoo and Nancy Poole of the Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health in collaboration with the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, and Canada FASD Research Network. Topics include: Brief Interventions with Girls and Women, Mothering, Wellness, Community Action, and Reconciliation and Healing. Printed booklets are being shared with those who attended the meeting in May and with Indigenous communities who may find them helpful as they plan FASD prevention efforts. Links to PDF versions are included in this blog.

Grounded in research, the booklets prioritize Indigenous knowledge for implementing culturally-safe, cross-disciplinary, cross-organizational, and collaborative approaches to FASD prevention. As well, each booklet offers discussion questions that shift the lens from a primary focus on alcohol use during pregnancy, to a holistic focus that aligns with Indigenous values and worldviews to support change and transformation in all systems of care.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) provided a process for discovering the harms and injustices that Aboriginal people experienced as part of the Indian Residential School system with an aim to build a lasting and respectful foundation of reconciliation across Canada. TRC findings were released in 2015 along with 94 Calls-To-Action (CTA), including CTA #33, which focuses on FASD prevention.

 

See earlier posts on these topics:

DEVELOPING AN INDIGENOUS APPROACH TO FASD PREVENTION IN BC’S FRASER SALISH REGION December 11, 2017

INNU COMMUNITY FASD PREVENTION IN LABRADOR October 27, 2017

FASD PREVENTION WITH INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES IN AUSTRALIA April 3, 2017

THE MOTHERING PROJECT/MANITO IKWE KAGIIKWE IN WINNIPEG, MANITOBA May 1, 2015

POSTCOLONIAL THEORY FOR BEGINNERS
September 1, 2010

The First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) in British Columbia is exploring a partnership approach to developing a community-based FASD prevention strategy in the Fraser Salish region.

Inspired by the Marulu Strategy in the Fitzroy Valley of Western Australia and the work of other Indigenous communities in Canada, the FNHA Community Wellness Support team brought together individuals and organizations working in health care, child welfare, early childhood development, community wellness and other related areas for a one-day meeting on December 1, 2017. The meeting was held on the on the traditional territory of the Musqueam people.

The meeting began with an opening prayer and welcome from a Musqueam Elder. In the morning, participants learned about the successful Family Empowerment Team in the Stó:lō Nation (the Stó:lō traditional territory extends from Yale to Langley, BC). The program is based on the Parent Child Assistance Program (PCAP) model developed by Therese Grant at the University of Washington in 1991 which has been shown to an effective approach to preventing FASD.

The Family Empowerment Team has built upon the PCAP model to develop a holistic and culturally relevant approach to FASD prevention in the Stó:lō Nation. Meeting attendees had the unique opportunity to hear from a woman who has participated in the program and to hear how the program has supported her and her family to reach her goals.

In the afternoon, members of Alberta’s Parent-Child Assistance Program Council shared their experiences of working with and supporting over 30 PCAP programs in Alberta and how different agencies, groups, and government departments have collaborated in developing a 10-year provincial strategy to address FASD.


For more on these topics, see these earlier posts:

Alberta Parent-Child Assistance Program Quilt, December 8, 2014

Films from the Lililwan Project: Tristan and Marulu, May 9, 2012

FASD Mentoring Programs in Canada, December 7, 2011

 

Overview: Four Levels of FASD Prevention

Information Sheet: What Men Can Do To Prevent FASD

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