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3rd in Series: First-ever FASD Prevention Plenary at the 7th International Conference on FASD: PART 2

“International Research on Discussing Alcohol with Women and Their Partners, and Empowering Professionals to Have These Conversations”: Tatiana Balachova, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center & Prevent FAS Research Group; Jocelynn Cook, Chief Scientific Officer for The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists; Lisa Schölin, Consultant at WHO Regional Office for Europe – Alcohol, Illicit Drugs and Prison Health; Leana Oliver, CEO of FARR; Cheryl Tan, Health Scientist CDC

Research shows that building awareness and offering brief interventions can help women reduce alcohol-exposed pregnancies. For a variety of reasons, not all providers feel comfortable or confident in giving information or asking about alcohol use, and they may not be sure it makes a difference in preventing alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Consequently, researchers from around the world presented their findings at the 7th International FASD Conference Prevention Plenary. They discussed whether or not brief interventions work, and if they do, then which strategies work best.

Russian study picRussia – Positive Messaging Improves Knowledge and Action

Tatiana Balachova, PhD, and her research group conducted a 3-part study to develop, implement, and test a prevention program in Russia. They found that women in Russia most trusted their OB/GYN physicians, so they developed FASD educational materials and trained physicians to deliver prevention information in two face-to-face structured interventions. FASD brochures using positive messages and images improved women’s knowledge of FASD and reduced risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancies. As well, they found that women who received the intervention reduced their frequency of alcohol use – most quitting – during in pregnancy.

JOGC picCanada – Care/Service Provider Education is key

Jocelynn Cook, Chief Scientific Officer for The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) detailed the Vision 2020 strategies: advocacy, quality of care, education, and growing stronger. These strategies underpin their goals for care providers to focus on preconception as well as pregnancy, and deliver consistent messaging. In line with these goals. Alcohol Use and Pregnancy Consensus Clinical Guidelines that were first published by the SOGC in August 2010 were updated in 2016. The guidelines highlight the value of brief interventions and will be supported in the coming year with online education and training that recognizes “red flags” and provide best practices for supporting women’s health and engagement in discussions on potentially stigmatizing topics such as alcohol use.

who-coverWorld Health Organization – Prevalence Rates Inform Strategy

Lisa Schӧlin, consultant with the World Health Organization’s European office, described the data from Europe on alcohol consumption and drinking during pregnancy. The most recent prevalence data shows that Europe has the highest consumption rate of alcohol per capita of anywhere else in the world. As well, at 25.2%, it has the highest rate of alcohol consumption during pregnancy and the highest rate of FAS (37.4 per 10,000). These data were published in a review of the evidence and case studies illustrating good practices and areas of European action called “Prevention of harm caused by alcohol exposure in pregnancy” – you can view or download here.

FARR picSouth Africa – Short Messages Can Build Awareness

Leana Oliver, CEO of Foundation for Alcohol Related Research (FARR), explained how FARR builds upon existing health services by providing prenatal support, pregnancy planning and teaching of coping strategies to women through their programmes. Their “Do you have 3 Minutes?” campaign has been successful in building awareness within communities and in supporting prevention programmes (learn more here). As well, the FARR Training Academy offers accredited trainings and continued professional development on FASD to professionals, providers and educators. Research projects and FARR publications detail what has been learned such as the benefits of motivational interviewing and the need for preconception care and planning.

CDC picU.S. – Promoting Universal Screening and Brief Intervention

Cheryl Tan, Health Scientist, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reviewed FASD activities currently underway. Surveillance of alcohol consumption by women of reproductive age is ongoing alongside efforts by the CDC to promote universal screening and brief interventions (aSBI) of adults 18+ years. She noted the wide discrepancy between how often providers say they conduct SBI (85%) and how often patients say they receive it (25%). As well, as a partner of the Collaborative of Alcohol-free Pregnancy, the CDC is helping to change healthcare practice through high-impact projects: 1) implement interprofessional model for prevention of AEP; 2) provide evidence for aSBI to insurers in the US; and, 3) reduce stigma associated with drinking during pregnancy.

For more these topics see earlier posts:

First-ever FASD Prevention Plenary at the 7th International Conference on FASD, March 22, 2017
WHO Europe: Prevention of harm caused by alcohol exposure in pregnancy, December 22, 2016
“Supporting pregnant women who use alcohol or other drugs: A guide for primary health care professionals”, May 15, 2016
How do partners affect women’s alcohol use during pregnancy?, August 11, 2014
Empowering Conversations to Prevent Alcohol Exposed Pregnancies: Extended Learning Webinars, May 8, 2014
The Prevention Conversation Project – Free Webcast on January 21, 2015 (Alberta FASD Learning Series), December 15, 2014
Alcohol and Pregnancy campaign from Norway, December 12, 2011
FASD Prevention in Russia, February 15, 2012

SR-FASD-brochure_2015_web_revised_Page_2

From the FASDay website:

“The first FAS Day began on September 9, 1999 in Auckland, New Zealand, where “Minute of Reflection” bells rang at 9:09 a.m., at Mt Albert Methodist church. Then it moved to Adelaide, Australia, and then to South Africa, where at 9:09 a.m., Cape Town volunteers gathered to hear the War Memorial Carillon that rang when Nelson Mandela was released from prison.

Volunteers in Italy, Germany and Sweden held events – and then FASDay crossed the Atlantic.  There were events in every time zone across Canada and the U.S., including ringing of carillons in Toronto, Niagara Falls, Hastings, NE, and Austin & San Antonio, Texas. The westernmost activity was the community breakfast on the tiny island of Kitkatla, B.C., near the Queen Charlotte Islands, where the village bell rang at 9:09 a.m. followed by prayers in the native tongue by village elders.”

Events to increase awareness about FASD are happening all over the world today and throughout September. Find out what’s happening in your community.

The image above is from a poster and brochure developed by the British Columbia Liquor Distribution Branch. (Each of Canada’s 13 provinces and territories has a liquor board or commission that oversees the control, distribution and sale of beverage alcohol in its jurisdiction. Many boards run FASD Awareness campaigns in the month of September as part of their social responsibility initiatives).

Here are a few other resources on FASD developed by members of the Canada FASD Research Network that you might want to share with others.

What Men Can Do

KNOW FASD

Pages from 19-2-PB

1_whydrink

Pages from FASD_WarningSignageInfoKit_Booklet_web

Pages from First-Nations-Women’s-Healing-Photoessay-web

treatmentcare_pregnantwomen

alcohol_women_Page_01

ENG_Whisky

The Too Young To Drink campaign was launched last week on September 9, 2014 (International FASD Awareness Day).

The launch of the campaign involved individuals and organizations displaying a banner of the campaign in a busy area of their home towns at 9:09am on September 9, 2014. Groups all over the world took pictures and made videos of themselves with the banners and shared them via social media, including Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

global images

Campaign materials are available in English, French, Spanish, Russian, Portugeuse, Japanese, Italian, Slovenia, and Polish. All the images feature a fetus immersed in a bottle of alcohol, but the bottle reflects the traditional drinks of various countries and regions: brandy from the Balkans, the French champagne, Italian wine, the English and Irish whiskey, and vodka of Eastern Europe.

The campaign visuals were developed by Fabrica, the organization that developed the Italian “Mummy Drinks, Baby Drinks” campaign (which I’ve blogged about in the past here and here). Fabrica is a communications research centre financed by Benetton.

Creative Director Erik Ravelo talks about the campaign in this “behind the scenes” video.

Visit the campaign website here. If you are interested in learning more about or joining the network, visit the Network website here. Also, read more about the background to the campaign in an article published in the International Journal of Alcohol and Drug Research earlier this year (Open Access).

RUS_Wodka

network

 

FAS Knot

From the FASDay website:

“The first FAS Day began on September 9, 1999 in Auckland, New Zealand, where “Minute of Reflection” bells rang at 9:09 a.m., at Mt Albert Methodist church. Then it moved to Adelaide, Australia, and then to South Africa, where at 9:09 a.m., Cape Town volunteers gathered to hear the War Memorial Carillon that rang when Nelson Mandela was released from prison.

Volunteers in Italy, Germany and Sweden held events – and then FASDay crossed the Atlantic.  There were events in every time zone across Canada and the U.S., including ringing of carillons in Toronto, Niagara Falls, Hastings, NE, and Austin & San Antonio, Texas. The westernmost activity was the community breakfast on the tiny island of Kitkatla, B.C., near the Queen Charlotte Islands, where the village bell rang at 9:09 a.m. followed by prayers in the native tongue by village elders.”

Events to increase awareness about FASD are happening all over the world today and throughout September. Find out what’s happening in your community.

Below are some of the posters that you might see in liquor stores across the country today. (Each of Canada’s 13 provinces and territories has a liquor board or commission that oversees the control, distribution and sale of beverage alcohol in its jurisdiction. Many boards run FASD Awareness campaigns in the month of September as part of their social responsibility initiatives).

FASD_Poster_VERTICAL_highres

fassy2

SR_FASD_Web poster

3-050_No-Thanks_Im_Pregnant_PosterWeb

no_alcohol_during_pregnancy

Be With Child Without Alcohol

 

NSLC-smbanner

LCBO

 

SPI

Next week, September 9th, is International FASD Awareness Day and there are numerous events happening across the province of Saskatchewan.

The Saskatchewan Prevention Institute is a non-profit organization that works to raise awareness and educate others about the prevention of disabling conditions in children. This year, the Institute filled requests from over 35 groups for resources and their “FASD: Let’s talk about it” T-shirts. The Institute is sponsoring a one-week tour by Myles Himmelreich who will be appearing in Saskatoon, Moose Jaw, Mossbank, Prince Albert, and Swift Current.

Other activities that are happening across the province include:

Agency Chiefs Tribal Council (Big River, Pelican Lake and Witchekan)

Community members are invited to pancake breakfasts. Materials about alcohol and pregnancy will be on display and shared with those who would like information. There are poster contests for the younger children. Grade 3 students have colouring books on pregnancy.

Ahtahkakoop Health Center

Ahtahkakoop has planned an FASD Awareness walk which will include the school and community. T-shirts were ordered that have last year’s winning design (from a local contest) on them. A lunch will be provided at the Band Hall as they introduce the winners of their FASD poetry and art contest! On September 5, presentations about FASD will be made to students.

Athabasca Health Authority

Events are taking place in Black Lake, Fond du Lac, Stony Rapids, and Uranium City. Pancake breakfasts will be held at each of the primary schools.  Some communities will hold walks and a candlelight vigil.

Creighton/Flin Flon

Creighton/ Flin Flon is bringing awareness about FASD to children and parents through:

  • participating in story-time for pre-school children
  • providing storybook about FASD for each child
  • donating books to library about FASD
  • holding myths and facts about FASD radio quiz with daily prizes

Gordon First Nation

Gordon First Nation has a speaker from the FASD Speakers’ Bureau.

Humboldt

Posters and information will be distributed around town for Awareness Day.

Kawakatoose

Kawakatoose has a guest speaker from FASD Speakers’ Bureau.

Moose Jaw FASD Regional Committee

Moose Jaw FASD Regional Committee is hosting two school presentations (Mossbank School, Moose Jaw Peacock Auditorium) with Myles Himmelreich.

Muskeg Lake

Muskeg Lake is having a display at kihiw waciston school on September 9 and ringing the bell at 9. They will have a display booth at noon to talk with kids.

North Battleford

The Regional FASD Committee is holding a high school hot dog/water promotion in parking lot, targeting high school students, to promote healthy lifestyles during pregnancy.

North Battleford Tribal Council

At Battle River Treaty 6 Health Centre, they are having FASD Awareness Walkathons with the schools in the 6 communities they serve.  Each walkathon participant will receive a bottle of water with a label that states Prevent FASD, 0-4-9. Kanaweymik ICFS Agency will also have a display at community BBQs they are having (Red Pheasant on September 9, and Moosomin September 17).

One Arrow First Nation

Prevention worker Nicole Fontaine will be guest speaker as well as a nurse and Linda Paintednose. They are serving lunch and having draws for t shirts.

Prince Albert

Prince Albert FASD Committee members have worked together to set up a mini-conference targeted at inter-professional capacity building and community awareness in Prince Albert. The FASD Support Network of Saskatchewan will present Principles and Practices in the morning. Myles Himmelreich will be a guest speaker in the afternoon.

- 'Metis Addictions Council of Saskatchewan Inc

 

Regina

In Regina, partner agencies have collected pledges for people to “Talk about FASD”.  On September 9, they are gathering as a group to share the pledges. People will be wearing FASD Awareness t-shirts. Beverly Palibroda from the Metis Addictions Council of Saskatchewan (MACSI) will address the crowd to explain about September 9th and the pledges. There will be a walk to Aboriginal Family Services for a BBQ from noon to 1:00. There is also a  media release and a digital sign message.

Saskatoon

MACSI is holding its 13th annual walk for FASD Awareness and lunch on September 9. Myles Himmelreich is a guest speaker at West Winds Primary Health Centre on September 8 at 11:00 a.m.

Swift Current

Myles Himmelreich is a guest speaker at the Safety Expo at the Cypress Hills Hospital on September 10. It will be broadcast on Telehealth so interested rural locations can partake in the presentation. A mini campaign is being held for Awareness Day. People will be taking “No Thanks I’m Pregnant” tent cards to local bars, lounges, and restaurants and baby stores.

Sunrise, Regina Qu’Appelle, and Sun Country Health Regions

Regional Kids-first is doing Mock-tails for Moms in different liquor stores in partnership with SK Liquor and Gaming, across 3 health regions.  At each location they will have a table set up with 2 different types of MockTails along with promotional materials and recipe cards for people to take home.

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For more ideas about FASD Day activities or to see what is happening around the world, visit FASDay.

 

 

Overview: Four Levels of FASD Prevention

Information Sheet: What Men Can Do To Prevent FASD

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