As we continue to connect our work in Canada on FASD prevention, via the Prevention Network Action Team on FASD Prevention from a Women’s Health Determinants Perspective (pNAT), new priorities for action emerge.  These are five priorities that this virtual community identified for the coming year.

  1. Cross-sector collaboration

Collaboration across fields provides an important opportunity to support mothers, children, and women who may be at risk of using substances during pregnancy. Resources, such as Mothering and Opioids: Addressing Stigma – Acting Collaboratively, highlight opportunities for collaboration across fields to foster advocacy, streamline service delivery and referrals, and offer systems navigation.

  1. Indigenous approaches to FASD prevention

There are an increasing number of wholistic FASD prevention and wellness programs that are incorporating culture and language, traditional knowledge, and land-based programming, while responding to the needs of families and communities. Programs such as Circle of Life in Terrace, Xyólhmettsel Syémyem (Family Empowerment Team) in Chilliwack and others highlighted in the recent booklet, Revitalizing Culture and Healing: Indigenous Approaches to FASD Prevention, bring attention to the importance of community-led, community-driven FASD prevention and wellness programs.

  1. Trauma-informed practice

Trauma-informed practice and policy development are essential components in responding to each level of the four-part prevention model. Trauma-informed services recognize the interconnections of trauma, mental health, and substance use and the role that substance use may have in coping with past or current violence or trauma. When discussing alcohol and other substance use, trauma-informed approaches will promote building relationships, building upon individuals’ strengths, and offering choice and collaboration in service provision.

  1. Stigma reduction

There has been an increasing focus on reducing stigma that mothers and women who use substances during pregnancy experience. By reducing stigma, pregnant women and mothers will be able to better access necessary supports and servicces that support stigma reduction. The recent issue paper from the Canada FASD Research Network on mothers’ experience of stigma through a multi-level model offers recommendations and recommended resources for service providers, health systems planners, and policymakers.

  1. Keeping families together

More attention is being brought to service delivery models that have the goal of keeping families together. These programs, which range from co-located multi-service programming to mentor and peer support models increase women’s access to prenatal care, health care, social support, advocacy, and childcare. PNAT members from programs such as the Parent-Child Assistance Program, Sheway in Vancouver, HerWayHome in Victoria, H.E.R. Pregnancy Program in Edmonton, Manito Ikwe Kagiikwe (the Mothering Project) in Winnipeg, and Mothercraft (Breaking the Cycle) in Toronto are helping us understand how this goal can be achieved in community contexts.