Recent study explores the long-term effects of alcohol use in girls

While not specific to pregnancy, you might be interested in checking out this article in The Atlantic which examines a recent study on the links between alcohol use in teen girls and breast cancer.

The link between alcohol use and chronic disease has been pretty well established in research. The report Alcohol and Health in Canada: A Summary of Evidence and Guidelines for Low-Risk Drinking (2011)  states:

Average long-term consumption levels as low as one or two drinks per day have been causally linked with significant increases in the risk of at least eight types of cancer (mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, liver, breast, colon and rectum) and numerous other serious medical conditions (e.g. epilepsy, pancreatitis, low birthweight, hemorrhagic stroke, dysrythmias, liver cirrhosis and hypertension).

Age is just one factor that contribute to women’s vulnerability to the effects of alcohol and is important to consider in prevention efforts that seek to address drinking patterns in the general population.

For more on this topic, see previous posts: