Non-profit organization in Nova Scotia launches a new campaign

Injury Free Nova Scotia has launched a cinema and online campaign to warn youth against the dangers of excessive drinking.

Marketing Magazine (Injury Free Nova Scotia brings the goat, June 7, 2011, Matt Semansky) describes the campaign:

The “No Magic Goat” campaign features a two-minute house party scene. Set to thumping electronic music, the video depicts teens drinking, dancing and making out with each other, but also vomiting and capturing each other’s vulnerable moments on mobile phone cameras.

According to this article, Shirley Ann Rogers, executive director of Injury Free Nova Scotia, says reckless drinking was a logical topic for the organization to address given the role alcohol plays in various kinds of accidents.

In terms of FASD prevention, collaboration with diverse organizations that are working more broadly to change the culture of drinking is interesting to explore. Rates of unplanned pregnancies remain high in Canada (stats usually suggest the rate is between 30-40%). For example, a recent article in CBC News reports that teen pregnancies in Canada continue to decline; however,  in 2006, the teen pregnancy rate was 27.9 per 1000 women aged 15-19 years (Canada’s teen pregnancy rate fall, May 27, 2011). An important group to  think about in terms of FASD prevention!

The No Magic Goat video began appearing in movie theatres in the Halifax and Sydney, N.S. areas on May 27. It can also be viewed on YouTube and TV spots will air in the near future.

Visit the the Injury Free Nova Scotia microsite NoMagicGoat.ca. You can read the 2007 report Changing the Culture of Alcohol Use in Nova Scotia: An Alcohol Strategy to Prevent and Reduce the Burden of Alcohol-Related Harm in Nova Scotia here and read the CBC coverage (Video aimed at reducing teen binge drinking, June 8, 2011) of the campaign here.