Data from the 2007/8 Canadian Community Health Survey was just published in the Journal of Population Therapeutics and Clinical Pharmacology which provides information on the number of women who drank during their last pregnancy.

The Canadian Community Health Survey is a survey that has been conducted by Statistics Canada every two years since 2000. It provides cross-sectional and longitudinal data on the health status, health determinants and health system utilization for the Canadian population. During the 2007/8 cycle, an additional questionnaire in Ontario and British Columbia asked 3004 women aged 15-55 years who gave birth(s) in last 5 years whether they drank any alcohol during their last pregnancy.

The survey found that the prevalence of drinking alcohol during pregnancy in Ontario was 5.4% and the prevalence in British Columbia was 7.2% (the difference between the two provinces was not statistically significant). When the data was extrapolated to the Canadian population as a whole, the prevalence of drinking alcohol during pregnancy was estimated at 5.8%.

Other articles in the summer issue (vol 17, issue 2) of the Journal of Population Therapeutics and Clinical Pharmacology that may be of interest to readers of this blog include:

Sanders, J.L. and Buck, G. (2010). A Long Journey: Biological and Non-Biological Parents’ Experiences Raising Children with FASD.

Fetal Alcohol Canadian Expertise Research Roundtable. 2010 FACE Poster Abstracts.

Koren, G. and Fernandes, A. (2010). Reviewers’ Bias Against the Null Hypothesis: the Reproductive Hazard of Binge Drinking.

Kim E., Sarkar, M., Navioz, Y., Koren, G., and Einarson, A. (2010) The Motherisk Alcohol and Substance Use Helpline: 10 Years of Experience and Counting.

Reference:

Thanh, N.X. and Jonsson. (2010). Drinking Alcohol during Pregnancy: Evidence from Canadian Community Health Survey 2007/ 2008. Journal of Population Therapeutics and Clinical Pharmacololgy, 17 (2): e302-e307